Understanding Asthma & Allergy










asthma & allergy



asthma inhaler

Here you will learn how allergies contribute to asthma, the allergens that usually trigger asthma attacks, effective natural supplements that treat underlying allergic symptoms, and more!

It is estimated that 50 million Americans suffer from allergies and asthma. That equates to nine million doctors visits because of allergies, and fourteen million doctors visits because of asthma. These two conditions are closely related; you can have asthma attacks and also suffer from allergy symptoms, since there is a strong allergic component to asthma (although not everyone with allergies develops asthma).

Most people agree that hay fever, rashes, watery eyes, itching and sneezing are typically associated with allergies (Click for more about allergy symptoms). But you might be surprised to learn that conditions such as asthma and depression can be caused by underlying allergies? Although asthma and allergies are two different diseases, they are both immune-based diseases that share a common diagnostic name: allergic airway syndrome (rhinobronchitis). Asthma, however, is considered to be more of a respiratory condition than an immune system condition.





What are allergies?



An allergy is an exaggerated and abnormal response of the body to allergens such as foods, food colorings and additives, clothing, plants like weeds and poison oak, and cosmetics. There are basically two types of allergies: IgE mediated allergies and hypersensitivity reactions.

With IgE mediated allergy, the body produces an excess of antibodies called immunoglobulins E. Histamine is released that produces the typical allergy symptoms. The second group of allergies, hypersensitivity reactions or intolerance, take place without the activation of antibodies. Lactose intolerance is an example, where a person lacks the enzyme to digest milk sugar and they experience symptoms such as diarrhea or stomach pain.


Certain allergens (or irritants) are known to trigger both allergy attacks and asthma attacks. Keep in mind you can greatly reduce their negative effects by using reputable allergy reduction products throughout your home.

This list of allergens is as follows:


• aerosol sprays, air pollution

• animal dander, medications

• cockroaches, cold temperatures

• dust mites, estrogen

• exercise, foods

• gastric reflux disease, heartburn

• heredity, molds

• obesity, perfumes

• pollens, sinus infections

• smoke, strong emotions

• sulfites, viruses

(From Pescatore, 2003, pgs. 27-28)



What is asthma?



Asthma is a disease, often of allergic origin, in which the airways of the lungs become hypersensitive to certain irritants. It is marked by continuous or labored breathing accompanied by sneezing, a sense of constriction in the chest, and often by attacks of coughing or gasping. Irritants cause the airways to constrict, bronchial tubes to swell, and mucus to develop, which makes it difficult for air to get into the lungs and out. Asthma attacks can cause damage in the form of scarring, to the lungs over time.

The four types of asthma include: allergic asthma, nonallergic asthma, mixed asthma, and acute asthma. The most common type is allergic asthma, or asthma that is triggered by allergens like pollen or mold. When one suffers an asthma attack, a trigger such as an allergen or even cold air irritates the airways, cause the release of chemicals such as histamines and leukotrienes. Then, muschles around the bronchial tubes tighten and inflammation may cause these muscles to spasm, making it difficult for iar to enter the lungs. Mucus develops, which you would wish to clear out but at the same time you can be gasping for air!

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asthma and allergy: how are they different?



Because these two diseases are so closely related, with symptoms that overlap, understanding the difference between asthma and allergies can be confusing. It may help to visualize some of the main differences below:



ALLERGY ASTHMA
fatigue, headache, runny nose, stuffy nose, sneezing, post nasal drip, itchy eyes shortness of breath, wheezing, and coughing
specific seasons or throughout the year intermittent or persistent
specific trigger causes symptoms can be allergic, nonallergic, exercise induced, drug induced
over the counter medicines often successful may need to go to the hospital
only life-threatening when anaphlactic reactions occur can be fatal,over 5,000 deaths anually


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the best natural supplements for treating allergies



As you have seen above, most cases of asthma have underlying allergies that irritate the airways of the lungs, making them hypersensitive. Although most patients choose medication to deal with their allergy symptoms, we are presenting below some excellent natural supplements for fighting allergies.





The Best Natural Supplements for Controlling Allergies
Vitamin C w/bioflavonoids Natural Antihistamine, adrenal function up to 5000mg daily, depending on bowel tolerance
Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid) Adrenal function, defends against stress up to 1000mg, 2 or 3x daily
CoQ10 Immune booster, counters histamine 60mg, 3 or 4x daily
Vitamin A Anti-infammatory, immune system 10,000 IU, 2 or 3x daily
AHCC (Active Hexose Correlated Compound) Immune system booster 500mg, once daily
Vitamin B12 Reduces inflammatory response 1,000 mcg daily in morning
Pantethine Produces coenzyme A, stress 300 mg 3times daily w/meals
Omega-3 Fatty Acids Reduces allergic reactions 1000mg daily
Quercitin Helps neutralize histamine up to 2000mg daily
Vitamin E & selenium Immune booster 400 IU daily & selenium 50 mcg twice daily
Grapeseed extract Immune booster 100mg 2x daily
Raw adrenal Immune booster 500mg, 2x daily
Magnesium relieves bronchospasm 400mg, daily
Full spectrum digestive enzyme supplement enhances assimilation & utilization of nutrients with each meal




Click Here to learn more about natural remedies for asthma and allergies


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Click Here for our Featured Case Study: Energy-Based Allergy Treatment...A New 24-hour Allergy Cure?

by Bob Fioravante, M.S.





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References

Edelman, Norman H. Family Guide To Asthma And Allergies, Time Life Media, Inc., 1997.

Haas, Elson M. Staying Healthy with Nutrition. Berkely, CA: Celestial Arts, 1992.

Pescatore, Fred. The Allergy and Asthma Cure. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2003

Kwong, Frank & Cook, Bruce. The Complete Allergy Book. Naperville, Ill: Sourcebooks, Inc., 2002.

Reader’s Digest. Fighting Allergies. Pleasantville, N.Y.: The Reader’s Digest Association, 2000.

Reader’s Digest. The Allergy Bible, Pleasantville, N.Y. “The Reader’s Digest Association, 2001.

Ross, Linda. Allergies Sourcebook. Frederick G. Ruffner, Jr., Publisher, 1997.