Pollen Allergy










About Pollen Allergy



allergy_escape



pollen allergy. If you're not certain what it is, that's O.K., your nose will let you know. Pollen is just one of the many airborne particles in our environment. You hardly even know pollen is there...unless you have a pollen sensitivity. Although we usually don't notice various allergens floating in the air, we inhale more than two tablespoons of airborne particles every day and many of us develop allergies to these ubiquitous "flying foes."

How do you know if you have a pollen allergy? You will develop hay fever symptoms, or what we call allergic rhinitis. We will discuss hay fever symptoms in detail below, but keep in mind that a good tip for diagnosing pollen sensitivity is that it can usually be identified by season.

If your symptoms are worse during the following seasons, then you are likely to suffer from a pollen allergy:



• In the spring when trees are pollinating

• In the early summer when grass and weeds are pollinating

• in autumn, when weeds allergens are still potent



Breakthrough Offer!

Do-it-Yourself Allergy Elimination Kit!

Respected allergy expert cracks the immune code and helps
you to expertly eliminate your allergies & sensitivities at home!

Click to view do-it-yourself Allergy Kit







pollen allergy - hay fever (allergic rhinitis)



Rhinitis is an inflammation of the mucous membrane which lines the nose and sinuses. This condition results in a runny nose and congestion, and it can be caused by respiratory infections as well as pollen allergy.

When we inhale pollen, the pollen particles act as irritants, causing mast cells in the nasal passages to release chemicals such as histamine. Allergic rhinitis can result, producing inflammation, increased mucous secretion, and a host of other symptoms that can result from pollen allergy.



Hay Fever Symptoms (Allergic Rhinitis)

pollen allergy, whether pollen from trees, grass, or weeds, has a detrimental effect on organs such as the throat, the nose, the larynx (voice box), the trachea, and the bronchioles. When pollens infiltrate the nose, hay fever symptoms occur. As we mentioned above, this can include symptoms such as congestion, sneezing, and nasal discharge. When pollen allergy affects the throat, a patient can experience itching and scratchiness. When the larynx is affected by pollen allergy, hoarseness and voice loss can occur. Finally, when pollen allergy affects the airways, tracheitis, asthma, and bronchitis can result.

Let's take a look at a more complete list of pollen allergy (hay fever) symptoms below:

• Sneezing often accompanied by a runny or clogged nose.

• Coughing and postnasal drip.

• Itching eyes, nose, and throat.

• Allergic shiners (dark circles under the eyes caused by increased blood flow near the sinuses).

• The “allergic salute” (in a child, persistent upward rubbing of the nose that causes a crease mark on the nose).

• Watering eyes.

• Conjunctivitis (an inflammation of the membrane that lines the eyelids, causing red-rimmed, swollen eyes and crusting of the eyelids).

• Post nasal drip.

• Mental dullness and fatigue

(from Ross, Linda M. Allergies Sourcebook, Frederick Ruffner, Jr., Publisher, 1997, p. 311)

Click Here to learn more about allergy symptoms



Other Airborne Allergens

Aside from pollen, there are other inhaled allergens that affect our respiratory system. These are some of the Top Inhalant Allergens, according to Kwong & Cook (2002, pg.34):

• Tree Pollen

• Grass Pollen

• Weed Pollen

• Mold spores

• Cat Dander

• Dog Dander

• House Dust Mites

Click here to learn more about
dust mites


In this section we are only concerned with pollens. We will address each pollen allergy individually in the section that follows. Toward the end, we’ll make recommendations on how you can reduce or eliminate your pollen allergy symptoms.



tree pollen allergy

Each spring, fall, and summer trees release pollen. Consequently, this is when pollen allergy takes its toll on us. The job of pollen is to fertilize other plants, but quite often pollen doesn’t reach its target. Many times, as your symptoms will attest, pollen winds up entering our noses and throats, making our lives difficult if not simply miserable. To make matters worse, pollen is practically inescapable; even if we seal off our houses, pollen will still find its way in.

Interestingly, plants with bright colored flowers usually don’t bother pollen allergy sufferers. It is the plain looking trees and plants that cause the greatest allergy symptoms.

The trees that are most likely to produce pollen allergy are as follows: Oak, ash, elm, hickory, pecan, box elder, and mountain cedar. We present a list of the top allergenic trees below, broken down by the section of the country where they are most prevalent and the time of year their pollens are most potent.



The Top pollen allergy Producing Trees in the Western U.S.

(Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montanna, Nevada, New Mexico,Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming)

Tree Pollen Season - February through June

(note: The juniper and acacia’s pollen allergy season begins earlier, approximately December)


The Top Pollen Producing Trees in the Western U.S.
Ash Birch
Cottonwood Walnut
Juniper Acacia
Mesquite Alder
Olive Box Elder
Mulberry Sycamore
Elm Cypress
Oak Maple



The Top pollen allergy Producing Trees in the Midwestern U.S.

(Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin)

Tree pollen allergy - April through May

(note: The maple’s pollen allergy season begins earlier, approximately February)


The Top Pollen Producing Trees in the Midwestern U.S.
Oak Hickory
Birch Sycamore
Cottonwood Walnut
Ash Beech
Maple Elm



The Top pollen allergy Producing Trees in the Southern/Southeastern U.S.

(Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas)

Tree pollen allergy Season - March through May

(note: The Mountain Cedar’s pollen allergy season begins earlier, approximately December)


The Top Pollen Producing Trees in the Southern/Southeastern U.S.
Oak Walnut
Birch Elm
Cottonwood Pecan
Ash Box Elder
Olive Box Elder
Maple Mountain Cedar
Hickory Mesquite
Sycamore --------



The Top pollen allergy Producing Trees in the Northeastern U.S.

(Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia)

Tree pollen allergy Season - April through May

(note: The Maple’s pollen season begins earlier, approximately February)

The Top Pollen Producing Trees in the Northeastern U.S.
Oak Hickory
Birch sycamore
Cottonwood Walnut
Ash Beech
Maple Elm











grass pollen allergy

There are over 1,000 types of grass that grow in America, but only a handful of those species cause pollen allergy. During the late spring and early summer, the following grasses pollinate and cause pollen allergy problems: timothy, bermuda, orchard, sweet vernal, red top, and bluegrass.

We have presented a complete list of the grasses below that cause highly allergenic pollen, and we’ve once again divided them into four regions of the United States, starting with the Western U.S.



The Top pollen allergy Grasses in the Western U.S.

(Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montanna, Nevada, New Mexico,Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming)

Grass pollen allergy Season - February through November

The Top Pollen Producing Grasses in the Western U.S.
Bermuda Meadow Fescue
Brome Orchard
Wild Oat Timothy
Red Top Johnson
Rye -------



The Top pollen allergy Producing Grasses in the Midwestern U.S.

(Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin)

Grass pollen allergy Season - May through July

The Top Pollen Producing Grasses in the Midwestern U.S.
Blue Perrenial Rye
Orchard Bermuda
Red Top Johnson
Timothy -------
                               



The Top pollen allergy Producing Grasses in the South/Southeast U.S.

(Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas)

Grass pollen allergy Season - April through November

The Top Pollen Producing Grasses in the South/Southeast U.S.
Blue Italian Rye
Orchard Bermuda
Red Top Johnson
Timothy -------



The Top pollen allergy Producing Grasses in the Northeastern U.S.

(Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia)

Grass pollen allergy Season - May through October

The Top Pollen Producing Grasses in the Northeast U.S.
Blue Perennial Rye
Orchard Bermuda
Red Top Meadow Fescue
Timothy Johnson
Sweet Vernal Italian Rye







weed pollen allergy

During the late summer and early fall, weed pollens do most of their damage to pollen allergy sufferers. Allergic rhinitis and asthma attacks are frequently caused by ragweed, sagebrush, pigweed, timbleweed, Russian thistle, and cockleweed.

We have presented a complete list of the weeds below that cause highly allergenic pollen, and we’ve once again divided them into four regions of the United States, starting with the Western U.S.


The Top pollen allergy Producing Weeds in the Western U.S.

(Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montanna, Nevada, New Mexico,Oregon, Utah, Washington, Wyoming)

Weed pollen allergy Season - April through November

The Top Pollen Producing Weeds in the Western U.S.
Ragweed Careless Weed
False Ragweed Pigweed
Sagebrush English Plantain
Tumbleweed Kochia
Scales Marsh Elder
Cocklebur Yellow Dock
Lambs Quarter -------



The Top pollen allergy Producing Weeds in the Midwestern U.S.

(Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin)

Weed pollen allergy Season - May through October

The Top Pollen Producing Weeds in the Midwestern U.S.
Giant Ragweed English Plantain
Short Ragweed Marsh Elder
Cocklebur Tumbleweed
Lambs Quarter Kochia
Pigweed -------



The Top pollen allergy Producing Weeds in the Southern/Southeastern U.S.

(Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas)

Weed pollen allergy Season - April through October

The Top Pollen Producing Weeds in the South/Southeast U.S.
Ragweed Pigweed
Sagebrush English Plantain
Yellow Dock Marsh Elder
Lambs Quarter Tumbleweed



The Top pollen allergy Producing Weeds in the Northeastern U.S.

(Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia)

Weed pollen allergy Season - May through September

The Top Pollen Producing Weeds in the Northeast U.S.
Giant Ragweed Pigweed
Short Ragweed English Plantain
Cocklebur Marsh Elder
Lambs Quarter Tumbleweed


Click here for more information about environmental allergies







pollen allergy - hay fever treatment



pollen_allergy_hay_fever



Medications

Medication for pollen allergy is the same as that for mold and other inhalant allergies: bronchodilators, antihistamines, and corticosteroids.

Immunotherapy

This involves a series of injections, in gradually increasing dosages, which include extracts of various allergens so that an individual with a particular pollen allergy can develop a tolerance to that allergen.

Energy-Based Allergy Elimination

Click Here For Our Featured Case Study: Energy-Based Allergy Treatment...A New 24-hour Allergy Cure?

Even though I was initially skeptical about this treatment, I later found-out how quickly and easily this energy-based method eliminates allergies. Yes, eliminates; I’m talking about a permanent cure of your pollen allergy or other allregies. There are thousands of practitioners in several countries who conduct this type of allergy elimination.

If you'd like to review the top vitamins, minerals, and herbs for pollen allergy,

Click Here to learn more about natural remedies for pollen allergy


Hay Fever Control Tips

• Limit outdoor exposure when pollen counts are highest; typically between 5:00 am and 10:00 am

• Keep your windows closed as much as possible during pollen season

• Stay in an air-conditioned home and workplace. This greatly reduces pollen exposure

• Use HEPA air filtration in your home, especially your bedroom

• Wash pets often, since they carry pollen into the house

• Rinse your nose with saline spray after being outdoors

• Don’t dry your bedding outdoors, since pollen clings to fabric

• Do not keep large amounts of vegetation around your yard

• Mow grass before it grows tall, so it doesn’t produce seedheads and pollen

• Remove weeds from your yard before they have a chance to pollinate

• Exercise indoors during pollen season





See Our Featured Case Study: Energy-Based Allergy Treatment...A New 24-hour Allergy Cure?

by Bob Fioravante, M.S.







I Welcome Your Comments and Suggestions...







References

Edelman, Norman H. Family Guide To Asthma And Allergies, Time Life Media, Inc., 1997.

Krohn, Jacqueline. Allergy Relief & Prevention, Hartley & Marks Publishers, Vancouver: BC, 2000.

Kwong, Frank & Cook, Bruce. The Complete Allergy Book, Sourcebooks, Inc., Naperville: Ill, 2002.

Reader’s Digest. Fighting Allergies, Pleasantville, N.Y.” The Reader’s Digest Association, 2000.

Reader’s Digest. The Allergy Bible, Pleasantville, N.Y. “The Reader’s Digest Association, 2001.